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Sid Hudson
Born: 1915

RHP 1940-42, 46-54 Senators , Red Sox

Sid Hudson's Teammates

  • All-Star in 1941-42

IPW-LERA
Career 2181104-1524.28

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The 6'4" Hudson jumped to the Senators after two years in the Florida State League, going 24-4 in the latter. His best major league mark was 17-16 as a rookie in 1940, and he pitched an inning in the 1941 All-Star Game. After military service (1943-45), Hudson resumed his place in the Senators' rotation, tying for the AL lead with 17 losses in 1949. A good-hitting pitcher, he batted .220 lifetime, .308 in 1947. Active until age 39, he became a longtime pitching coach, instructor, and scout. (MC)
FROM THE BASEBALL CHRONOLOGY
» May 23, 1940: In front of just 793 paid customers in St. Louis, the Browns trip the Senators, 8–7, in 12 innings. Jimmy Bloodworth's 2-run home run gives the Nats the lead in the top of the 12th, but the George McQuinn's 2nd homer of the day, a single, and a triple by Rip Radcliff, who scores on a sac fly gives St. Louis the win over Sid Hudson.

» June 21, 1940: Washington rookie Sid Hudson takes a no-hitter into the 9th inning, but the Browns Rip Radcliff hits a pop fly double down the RF line with no outs. A passed ball puts him on 3rd, but Hudson retires three for a 1–0 win. He'll beat the A's on a one-hit shutout in August.

» August 6, 1940: Rookie Sid Hudson one-hits the A's on his way to a 17-win season for the hapless Senators. It's his 2nd 1-hit shutout this year. Hudson pitched for Sanford (Class D Florida) last year and was 24–4.

» May 28, 1941: The New York Yankees edge the Washington Senators, 6–5, before 25,000 in the first night game at Griffith Stadium. George Selkirk twinkles with a pinch grand slam, and Joe DiMaggio triples against Sid Hudson.

» April 27, 1947: Today is Babe Ruth Day at all ML parks. A crowd of 58,339 at Yankee Stadium honors the ailing slugger, A frail Babe, choking back tears, tells the "kids of America" that, "the only real game in the world is baseball. In this game you have to come up from youth. You've got to start way down at the bottom, if you're going to be successful like those boys over there." pointing to the Yankee dugout. "There's so many lovely things said about me, I'm glad I had the opportunity to thank everybody." The program was broadcast nationwide and piped into all the ball parks. Ruth receives a bronze plaque with his image on it from the American League: the National League's gift is a leather book with signatures of all the players in the league. The Yankees lose to Sid Hudson and the Washington Senators 1–0, but move into first place as the White Sox lose two. Hudson scores the only run after singling.

» August 17, 1948: Tom Henrich hits his 4th grand slam of the season, off the Senators Sid Hudson, to join Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and York—and, later, Al Rosen and Ray Boone—for the American League record. Henrich, who broke in with the Yankees in 1937, had never hit a grand slam before this season. Bob Porterfield wins for New York, 8–1.

» May 4, 1949: White Sox infielder Floyd Baker, who will play 874 games in his 13 year ML career, hits his only home run, off Sid Hudson, into "Home Run Lane," named for GM Frank Lane, in an 8–7 loss to Washington.

» September 18, 1951: In the first of two games today, Browns pitcher Tommy Byrne hits a grand slam off the Senators Sid Hudson in the 9th inning to ice the game, 8-0. It's the first grand slam for the Browns this year. In the nitecap, Byrne cracks a 10th-inning pinch single to give the Browns a 3–2 victory,